Health Tips
Diabetes :
Are you worried about sugar level in your body? Diabetes is a condition that impairs the body's ability to process blood glucose. Well! Read natural treatments & necessary precautions to overcome this problem. You can ask your query to both Allopathy & Ayurveda experts.
Published  

Risk of Diabetes and Heart Disease May Spike Before Menopause

Dr. HelloDox Care #
HelloDox Care
Consult

Women may be at greater risk for developing diabetes, heart disease and stroke in the years before menopause, rather than afterward, a U.S. study suggests. This may mean that the higher cardiovascular risk seen among post-menopausal women could be related to changes in that time before menopause and less so to the changes after menopause has occurred," said lead study author Dr. Mark DeBoer, a researcher at University of Virginia School of Medicine in Charlottesville. While the reasons for this are unclear, the findings suggest that women may need to pay especially close attention to cardiovascular risk factors in the years leading up to menopause and consider lifestyle changes like improved diet and exercise habits that can make problems like diabetes and heart disease less likely, DeBoer added by email.
Menopause typically happens between ages 45 and 55. As the ovaries curb production of estrogen and progesterone, menstruation stops, and women can experience symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats and vaginal dryness. Certain treatments for menopause symptoms that contain man-made versions of the hormones estrogen and progestin have also been linked to an increase risk of heart attack and stroke.Previous research has also linked menopause to an increased risk of what's known as metabolic syndrome, a constellation of conditions that increase the risk of heart disease, diabetes and stroke. Obesity, inactivity and a history of smoking appear to make these problems more likely.
For the current study, researchers examined data on 1,470 white and African-American women participating in a national study of the causes and health effects of hardening of the arteries.All of the women went through menopause during the ten-year study period.Researchers focused on five things that contribute to metabolic syndrome: expanding waist circumference, elevated fats in the flood, declines in so-called "good" HDL cholesterol, spikes in blood pressure and increased levels of sugar in the blood. After taking into account whether women used hormone-replacement therapy, researchers still found bigger changes in triglycerides (fats in the blood), cholesterol and glucose (blood sugar) before menopause than afterwards.For white women, waist size spiked more after menopause, however.African-American women experienced larger increases in blood pressure after menopause than before, the researchers report in the Journal of the American Heart Association.
One limitation of the study is that researchers defined the timing of menopause based on whether women said they had a menstrual period in the previous two years, the authors note. Menopause is commonly diagnosed after women cease menstruation for one year, which means the study may have categorized some women as going through this transition who had already completed it. Researchers also lacked data on hormone levels for individual women, even though these can fluctuate and influence the risk for metabolic problems, said Dr. Robert Eckel, of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora.
Not all types of hormone-replacement therapy carry the same risks, and the study also didn't account for the way hormones were administered, Eckel, who wasn't involved in the study, said by email. "Cardiovascular disease screening remains important for all adults including men and women," Eckel said. "Perhaps the frequency of evaluation should be more emphasized in this important peri-menopausal interval (between ages 45-55) in women - more science needed here."

Published  

How Depression Is Linked to Diabetes During Pregnancy

Dr. HelloDox Care #
HelloDox Care
Consult

Depression in early pregnancy more than doubles the risk of gestational diabetes, which, in turn, increases risk of postpartum depression six weeks after giving birth, says a study.Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes occurring only in pregnancy and, if untreated, may cause serious health problems for mother and infant.

"Our data suggest that depression and gestational diabetes may occur together," said study first author Stefanie Hinkle from US National Institutes of Health's Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

"Until we learn more, physicians may want to consider observing pregnant women with depressive symptoms for signs of gestational diabetes. They also may want to monitor women who have had gestational diabetes for signs of postpartum depression," Hinkle noted.

Although obesity is known to increase the risk for gestational diabetes, the likelihood of gestational diabetes was higher for non-obese women reporting depression than for obese women with depression, the study found.
The researchers analysed pregnancy records from the NICHD Fetal Growth Studies-Singleton Cohort, which tracked the progress of thousands of pregnancies, to understand the patterns of fetal growth.

The study enrolled 2,334 non-obese and 468 obese women in weeks eight to 13 of pregnancy.

The women responded to questionnaires on symptoms of depression when they enrolled in the study, again between the 16th and 22nd week of pregnancy, and then six weeks after giving birth.

The researchers found that women who had the highest scores for depression in the first and second trimesters -- about 17 percent -- had nearly triple the risk for gestational diabetes when compared to women who had lower depression scores.

Of the women who developed gestational diabetes, nearly 15 percent experienced depressive symptoms after birth, which was more than four times that of women who had not had gestational diabetes, showed the study published online in the journal Diabetologia.

The researchers believe that high blood sugar levels may lead to inflammation, hormonal, and other changes that could lead to symptoms of depression.

Published  

Maternal B12 Deficiency May up Diabetes Risk in Babies

Dr. HelloDox Care #
HelloDox Care
Consult

Women with vitamin B12 deficiency during pregnancy may predispose their children to metabolic diseases such as Type-2 diabetes, a team of researchers led by one of Indian origin has warned.

The vitamin is found in animal products, including fish, meat, poultry, eggs and milk.

Its deficiency are more likely to occur in pregnant women, who follow a vegetarian diet, the study said.

"The nutritional environment provided by the mother can permanently programme the baby's health," said Ponusammy Saravanan, Associate Clinical Professor at the University of Warwick in Britain.

In this study, researchers hypothesised that the changes associated with B12 deficiency may be the result of abnormal levels of leptin - the hormone that tells us we are full after eating.

"Maternal B12 deficiency may affect fat metabolism and contribute to this risk. This is why we decided to investigate leptin, the fat cell hormone," Saravanan added.

Leptin is produced by human body's fat cells and its levels rise in response to eating food.
While lean diets are associated with normal levels of leptin, obesity causes levels to rise and remain consistently higher than normal.

This can eventually lead to leptin resistance, continued overeating, and an increased risk of insulin resistance, which leads to Type-2 diabetes, the researchers observed, adding that leptin can provide an effective 'marker' for body fat.

The study showed that babies born to mothers with B12 deficiency had higher than normal leptin levels.

This suggests that maternal B12 deficiency can adversely programme the leptin gene, changing the levels at which the hormone is produced while the foetus grows.

"The leptin can increase for two reasons. Either low B12 drives fat accumulation in the foetus, and this leads to increased leptin, or the low B12 actually causes chemical changes in the placental genes that produce leptin, making more of the hormone," explained Adaikala Antonysunil from University of Warwick.

The study was presented at the Society for Endocrinology's annual Conference in Brighton.

Published  

Higher Maternal Iron Levels May up Gestational Diabetes Risk

Dr. HelloDox Care #
HelloDox Care
Consult

Pregnant women who are particularly vulnerable to iron deficiency, may also be at risk if iron is found in excess in their bodies. They are likely to develop gestational diabetes, a study has found.

As a strong pro-oxidant, free iron can promote several cellular reactions that generate reactive oxygen species and increase the level of oxidative stress.

Oxidative stress induced from excess iron accumulation can cause damage to and death of pancreatic beta cells which produce insulin, and consequently, contribute to impaired insulin synthesis and secretion.

In the liver, high iron stores may induce insulin resistance via impaired insulin signalling as well as by limiting the capacity of the liver to extract insulin, the researchers said.

"Higher maternal iron stores may play a role in the development of gestational diabetes starting as early as the first trimester," said Cuilin Zhang from Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), in the US.

In the study, the researchers looked at several biomarkers of iron status, including plasma hepcidin, ferritin, and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), in 107 gestational diabetes cases and 214 controls.
They found that in the second trimester of pregnancy, those in the top 25 per cent of levels of hepcidin and ferritin had around a 2.5 times increased subsequent risk of developing gestational diabetes compared with those in the bottom 25 per cent.

In additon, a possible link between higher iron stores and abnormal blood sugar control, including Type 2 diabetes, in non-pregnant individuals, was also found.

"These findings raise potential concerns about the recommendation of routine iron supplementation among pregnant women who already have sufficient iron," Zhang noted, in the paper published in the journal Diabetologia.

Published  

Women with PCOS More Likely to be Affected by Diabetes: AIIMS Study

Dr. HelloDox Care #
HelloDox Care
Consult

An AIIMS study has claimed that women suffering from polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a condition of hormonal imbalance, are more likely to be affected by diabetes.

Notably, the polycystic ovary syndrome has taken epidemic proportions in the country affecting around 23 per cent women.

The study by Dr Mohammad Ashraf Ganie, Associate Professor, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, AIIMS, was published in American Society of Reproductive Medicine Journal (Fertility sterility) in July.

During the study, 2,047 women from Delhi and Jammu and Kashmir, suffering from polycystic ovary syndrome, were screened.

"Polycystic ovary syndrome can cause irregular periods, unwanted hair growth, and glucose intolerance due to hormone imbalance," Dr Ganie said.

"Out of the 2,047 women, 36 per cent, aged between 14 to 40 years, were found to be suffering from pre-diabetes and diabetes. These women have central obesity. They have high levels of insulin and male hormone due to sedentary lifestyle, consumption of high-calorie diet and genetic tendency," he said.
"Insulin resistance, a condition in which the body produces insulin but does not use it effectively, has been recognised as a risk factor for diabetes," Dr Ganie said.

According to World Health Organisation (WHO), an estimated 3.4 million deaths are caused due to high blood sugar, 80 per cent of which occur in low and middle-income countries.

According to Diabetes Atlas-2015 by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), 69.1 million people are affected with diabetes in India, the second highest after China, which has 109 million people with diabetes.

By 2030, the number of diabetes patients in the country is likely to rise to 101 million, an estimate by the World Health Organisation (WHO) claims.

Dr. Dharmendra Singh
Dr. Dharmendra Singh
MS/MD - Ayurveda, Cardiologist Diabetologist, 1 yrs, Pune
Dr. Virag  Kulkarni
Dr. Virag Kulkarni
BAMS, Ayurveda Panchakarma, 14 yrs, Pune
Dr. Varun kumar  PT
Dr. Varun kumar PT
BPTh, Homecare Physiotherapist Physiotherapist, 5 yrs, Pune
Dr. Vijay Mane
Dr. Vijay Mane
BHMS, Homeopath Family Physician, 22 yrs, Pune
Dr. Chetana  Mahajan
Dr. Chetana Mahajan
DHMS, Homeopath, 22 yrs, Pune
Hellodox
x
Open in App